Lisa Noble:
A Tale of Two Cabins


Jutting out into Lake Winnipeg, Lisa’s father called this nearby public pier his “office” / Photo courtesy of Lisa Noble
Jutting out into Lake Winnipeg, Lisa’s father called this nearby public pier his “office” / Photo courtesy of Lisa Noble


Time in and around the cabins offers a slower pace of living for Lisa and her family—a welcome escape from everyday life. Everything from bird sounds to naps in the yard to long walks on the shoreline are personal and precious. Beyond rest and relaxation, the cabins are a place of rejuvenation and renewal.

Cabin Life


“If you’re the first to wake up, you can get outside for a walk down the dirt roads to visit the lakeside alone. Upon returning to the cabin, you might see the blinds opened and family members stirring inside, brewing coffee, and making breakfast. All of this is done to the soundtrack of the CBC radio. Before lunch there is usually a chore or repair or errand to run, maybe some gardening or yard work, followed by a walk down to the lake for a quick swim to cool off.  

Lunch is usually something simple like a sandwich or salad. Then it’s back to the lake for more swimming or perhaps a long walk or bike ride to the adjacent municipalities to visit the shops, and fisherman and farmer stands. Or one might hang back to enjoy a nap in the hammock in the yard. Late afternoon is the time when cold drinks are served while the grill gets fired up. Everyone is busy—chopping the vegetables we’ve grown ourselves, preparing the meat, or making something nice from Amma’s recipe box.

Dinner is an event and all are welcome. Sometimes there are friends who stop by unannounced just because they know there’s a good chance we’ll be there (that’s sort of an old country/farm thing—to just show up for a visit without calling first… although my family did that in the city, too.). Everyone is invited to join for dinner and stay late for card games or to talk and listen to music. Later, after everyone is gone, we climb into our beds and fall asleep in near total darkness and quiet to begin another day.”

—Lisa Noble

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© AIA Washington DC 2021